Posts in the «Clear» Category

SoME 2010 Dec: Prime notes

Sound Of the Month Edition

Music of the prime numbers

Prime Notes visualization

Each harmonic corresponds to one prime number. A note is played on its beat-multiplication

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Zipped project

This idea was on my mind long before starting the whole Falasol project. What kind of cacophony would it be if each note is assigned a prime number and played only on the number’s multiplication beats. Total chaos? Or would the mind be able to recognize some hidden patterns?

It’s both. The brain can grasp 2 & 3-beat notes and arrange them into 6-beat tact ( 2 * 3 = 6 ). Next 5-beat harmonic creates a 30 beat verse (consisting of 5 described tacts). That’s the rhythmical clocking in the background. Next prime harmonics (7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37) add nothing more than chaotic wind-bells effect. The resulting patterns are way too long to be digested by the regular brain, but who knows, maybe some savant would do. Anyway, quite a good accompaniment to get insane :)

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SoME 2010 Nov: Encoded transmission

Sound Of the Month Edition

Message right to your brain

Sound perception graph

Understanding sound impact on human mind

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Before reading further, please listen to the above sample. …read more >>

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SoME 2010 Oct: Popcorn

Sound Of the Month Edition

Falasol’s new features are popping up like crazy!

Popcorn effect spectrogram

Popcorn effect spectrogram

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Falasol 1.2 is in beta phase! Let’s have a sneak peek into what’s coming. …read more >>

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SoME 2010 Sep: Harmonica obsession

Sound Of the Month Edition

She’s low-budget. She’s mobile. She’s a perfect companion!

Harmonica

My Harmonica

Yes, that’s my recent fascination. Makes a clear and gentle sound. Can get rough when needed.
Of course I couldn’t resist to record myself and analyze it with my geeky tools. Let’s get the show started. …read more >>

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SoME 2010 Aug: Harmonic Burst

Sound Of the Month Edition

Accelerating Vibrato makes a Sine wave explode into multiple harmonics

Harmonic Burst spectrogram

One sine wave + high speed frequency modulation

440 Hz harmonic modulated with speed: 0 -> 220 -> 0 [Hz] and amplitude: 0 -> 3 -> 0 [octave]

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Zipped Falasol project.

Looks like UFO and sounds like one :)

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SoME 2010 April: Ping of Death

Sound Of the Month Edition

(2 IV 2010 note: this post was an April Fools Day joke. But if you were brave enough to listen you already figured that out ;)

Neural overload – induced consciousness loss

Ping of death - sonogram

Shepard's tone modulated with brainwave frequency

Brainwaves originate in cyclic feedback interactions among populations of neurons (Neural_oscillation). In macro scale we can observe it with electroencephalography (EEG). What’s more, we can also influence these cycles – human brain has a tendency to change its dominant EEG frequency towards the frequency of a dominant external stimulus (Brainwave entertainment). We can easily exploit that behavior :)

Brainwave stimulation is commonly used technique in marketing industry.

You probably noticed that the music used in advertisements sounds a bit different than the original tracks. A slight tone modulation can alter your attitude – get you a little happier or more excited… and more likely to buy a product. Many emo rock bands use the same technique but with opposite effect.

My idea is to make the human neural system synchronize with continuously ascending¬† Shepard frequency. Such attempt results in neural deadlock which causes temporal consciousness loss. In order to restore it’s critical functions the brain must cut-off all the inputs and go through coma stage (just like computer restarts after blue screen of death). The process is still in research stage, so in order to prove the phenomenon is safe for health I need a control group of humans.

Help me broadcast the Ping of Death over commercial radio station – please donate.

There might be different reactions after recovering from unconsciousness – varying from slight headache, just feeling refreshed or having weird thoughts. I also noticed the audio-induced coma might be a bit addictive, but no harm seems to be done. Please use headphones (for others sake), remove the nearby sharp objects and sit down comfortably:

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SoME 2010 March: Nyquist frequency

Sound Of the Month Edition

This is what you get when you mess with Nyquist frequency!

Nyquist frequency

Glissando from 422400 to 422,4Hz with sampling frequency of 44000Hz

In the analog world the hyperbola from the right side of the graph would go all the way up. You actually wouldn’t be able to hear such high pitches, but you’d see a nice hockey stick on the spectrogram. However digital sampling is not able to handle frequencies higher than half of it’s own frequency – that’s the Nyquist theorem. And that’s when the weird things start to happen :)

Sounds like a plasma cannon:

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Falasol Timbre project file: Nyquist effect.timbre

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Experiments: Pitch perception

Natural or instrumental sounds usually consist of complex harmonic structure. In this post I’ll try to explore basics of human pitch perception.

According to wikipedia: “Pitch represents the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound”. Let’s try to validate it on a simple example – sample consisting of 4 harmonics – integer multiples of 440Hz: 440Hz, 880Hz, 1320Hz, 1760Hz. Below you can find a recording of the sample repeated four times, each time followed by a single successive harmonic:

Sound followed by each of 4 harmonics

Sound followed by each of 4 harmonics

4 harmonics (Timbre file – pitch 440 with 4 harmonics) …read more >>

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Experiments: slur vs. cross-fade

There are several ways of moving smoothly from one tone to the other. Today we are going to compare the two most common: slurring and cross-fading.

Slur

Gliding over the notes smoothly (sliding the tone).

Guitar slide

Guitar slide


…read more >>

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Experiments: kick off

Welcome to Falasol Experiments series.

Here we’ll try to take the application to the limits and try to answer some intriguing questions related to the nature of sound.

…read more >>

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